Skip directly to searchSkip directly to the site navigationSkip directly to the page's main content

Bernalillo County Environmental Health Community Profile

Environmental Health Community Profile Report Options

Environmental Public Heath Tracking IndicatorsValuesCompared To
Bernalillo  CountyNew MexicoU.S.New MexicoU.S.
An asthma hospitalization is an admission to the hospital by a New Mexico resident that occurs in state with asthma listed as the primary (first-listed) diagnosis. Asthma hospitalizations include those with ICD-9 codes 493.0-493.92 and ICD-10-CM J45 after 10/2015.
Asthma Hospital Admissions
(Hospital Admissions Per 10,000 Population, 2016-2020)
5.1
(4.8 - 5.4)
4.7Worse
A cleft lip occurs when the fetal components of the lip fail to fuse or join, which forms a groove or fissure in the lip. A cleft palate occurs when the palate fails to fuse properly, which forms a grooved depression or fissure in the roof of the mouth. Prevalence of cleft lip with or without cleft palate is the number of live-born infants with cleft lip with or without cleft palate per 10,000 live-born infants. (Live-born infants are the infants born with any evidence of life.) New Mexico live-born infants with cleft lip who may or may not also have a cleft palate, 2015-2019.
Birth Defects - Prevalence of Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate per 10,000 Live Births
(Prevalence per 10,000 Live Births, 2015-2019)
3.3
(1.4 - 5.1)
4.2Similar
A cleft palate occurs when the palate fails to fuse properly, which forms a grooved depression or fissure in the roof of the mouth. A cleft lip occurs when the fetal components of the lip fail to fuse or join, which forms a groove or fissure in the lip. Prevalence of cleft palate without cleft lip is the number of live-born infants with cleft palate without cleft lip per 10,000 live-born infants. (Live-born infants are the infants born with any evidence of life.) New Mexico live-born infants with cleft palate who do not have a cleft lip, 2015-2019.
Birth Defects - Prevalence of Cleft Palate without Cleft Lip per 10,000 Live Births
(Prevalence per 10,000 Live Births, 2015-2019)
8.2
(5.3 - 11.1)
9.3Similar
Gastroschisis is a birth defect of the abdominal (belly) wall. The baby's intestines stick outside of the baby's body, through a hole beside the belly button. The hole can be small or large and sometimes other organs, such as the stomach and liver, can also stick outside of the baby's body. Prevalence of gastroschisis is the number of live-born infants with gastroschisis per 10,000 live-born infants. (Live-born infants are the infants born with any evidence of life). New Mexico live-born infants with gastroschisis, 2015-2019.
Birth Defects - Prevalence of Gastroschisis per 10,000 Live Births
(Prevalence per 10,000 Live Births, 2015-2019)
8.2
(5.3 - 11.1)
7.5Similar
Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a problem with the heart's structure that is present at birth (congenital). It is a group of related defects that, together, mean that the left side of the heart is underdeveloped. The prevalence of HLHS is the number of live-born infants with HLHS per 10,000 live born infants. (Live-born infants are the infants born with any evidence of life). New Mexico live-born infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), 2015-2019.
Birth Defects - Prevalence of Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome per 10,000 Live Births
(Prevalence per 10,000 Live Births, 2015-2019)
0.30.7Similar
Hypospadias is a birth defect in which the opening of the urethra (the tube that carries urine from the bladder to the outside of the body) is located on the underside of the penis or on the perineum (area between the genitals and the anus). The corresponding defect in females is rare. Prevalence of hypospadias is the number of live-born infants with hypospadias per 10,000 live-born male infants. (Live-born infants are the infants born with any evidence of life). New Mexico live-born infants with hypospadias, 2015-2019
Birth Defects - Prevalence of Hypospadias per 10,000 Live Male Births
(Prevalence per 10,000 Live Births, 2015-2019)
69.3
(57.4 - 81.1)
55.0Worse
Spina bifida is one of a group of birth defects that is associated with failure of the neural tube to close. Specifically, spinal bifida without anencephaly is a core condition that is described as an incomplete closure of the vertebral spine through which spinal cord tissue and/or the membranes covering the spine (meninges) herniate. It usually occurs posteriorly. Spina bifida without anencephaly is characterized by a direct opening that is easily seen at the infant's back upon physical examination at delivery. Prevalence of spina bifida is the number of live-born infants with spina bifida but without anencephaly per 10,000 live-born infants. (Live-born infants are infants born with any evidence of life.) New Mexico live-born infants with spina bifida (without anencephaly), 2015-2019
Birth Defects - Prevalence of Spina Bifida (without Anencephaly) per 10,000 Live Births
(Prevalence per 10,000 Live Births, 2015-2019)
1.4
(0.2 - 2.6)
2.7Better
Transposition of the great arteries (TGA) is a heart condition that is present at birth, and often is called a congenital heart defect. TGA occurs when the two main arteries going out of the heart--the pulmonary artery and the aorta--are switched in position, or "transposed." Prevalence of TGA is the number of live-born infants with TGA per 10,000 live born infants. (Live-born infants are the infants born with any evidence of life). New Mexico live-born infants with transposition of the great arteries (TGA), 2015-2019.
Birth Defects - Prevalence of Transposition of the Great Arteries (Vessels) per 10,000 Live Births
(Prevalence per 10,000 Live Births, 2015-2019)
1.9
(0.5 - 3.3)
1.7Similar
Tetralogy of Fallot is a problem with the heart's structure that is present at birth. This defect changes the normal flow of blood through the heart. Tetralogy of Fallot is a combination of four defects: a hole in the wall between the ventricles (two lower chambers of the heart), called a ventricular septal defect; narrowing of the tube that carries blood from the heart to the lungs, called pulmonary stenosis; the aorta (the tube that carries oxygen-rich blood to the body) grows from both ventricles, rather than from the left ventricle only; and a thickened muscular wall of the right ventricle, called right ventricular hypertrophy. Prevalence of tetralogy of Fallot is the number of live-born infants with tetralogy of Fallot per 10,000 live born infants. (Live-born infants are the infants born with any evidence of life). New Mexico live-born infants with tetralogy of Fallot, 2015-2019.
Birth Defects - Prevalence of Tetralogy of Fallot per 10,000 Live Births
(Prevalence per 10,000 Live Births, 2015-2019)
3.8
(1.8 - 5.8)
2.9Similar
Preterm live singleton births is the number of live singleton infants born before 37 weeks of gestation to resident mothers divided by total number of live singleton infants born to resident mothers. Also considered preterm are 'Very low birthweight' live singleton births, the number of live born singleton infants with a birthweight of less than 1,500 grams divided by total number of live singleton infants born to resident mothers. New Mexico implemented the new standard birth certificate in 2008.
Birth Outcomes - Preterm Singleton Births
(Percentage Preterm, 2015-2019)
8.8%
(8.5% - 9.1%)
8.4%Worse
The ratio of total males/total females born in a geographic area at a certain time.
Birth Outcomes - Sex Ratio at Birth
(Males per 100 Females, 2017-2019)
106.0
(103.3 - 108.7)
104.4
The Total Fertility Rate indicates the average number of births to a hypothetical cohort of 1,000 women if they experienced the age-specific birth rates observed in a given year.
Birth Outcomes - Total Fertility Rate
(Expected Number of Births, 2017-2019)
1,513
(1,506 - 1,520)
1,706
Brain and Central Nervous System (CNS) cancer incidence refers to the number of persons newly diagnosed with brain and CNS cancers within a specified time period and age group. Measures include 1) the number of newly diagnosed brain and CNS cancer cases; and 2) age-adjusted brain and CNS incidence rates (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population). All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons.
Cancer Incidence - Brain and Central Nervous System Cancer
(Cases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjusted, 2015-2019)
5.8
(5.0 - 6.6)
5.4Similar
Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) incidence refers to the number of persons newly diagnosed with CLL within a specified time period. Measures include 1) the number of newly diagnosed CLL cases; and 2) age-adjusted CLL incidence rates (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population). Rates are expressed per 100,000 persons.
Cancer Incidence - Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
(Cases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjusted, 2015-2019)
5.6
(4.8 - 6.3)
4.4Worse
Esophageal cancer incidence refers to the number of persons newly diagnosed with esophageal cancer during a specified time period. Measures include 1) Number of newly diagnosed esophageal cancer cases; and 2) Age-adjusted esophageal cancer incidence rates per 100,000 population.
Cancer Incidence - Esophagus Cancer
(Cases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjusted, 2015-2019)
3.4
(2.8 - 4.0)
3.7Similar
Kidney and renal pelvis cancer incidence refers to the number of persons newly diagnosed with cancer of the kidney and renal pelvis during a specified time period. Measures include: 1) number of newly diagnosed cases of the kidney and renal pelvis cancer; and 2) age-adjusted incidence rate of the kidney and renal pelvis cancer (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population). All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons. Measures are provided by sex and race/ethnicity.
Cancer Incidence - Kidney and Renal Pelvis
(Cases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjusted, 2015-2019)
14.9
(13.7 - 16.2)
16.0Similar
Larynx cancer incidence refers to the number of persons newly diagnosed with larynx cancer during a specified time period. Measures include 1) the number of newly diagnosed larynx cancer cases; and 2) age-adjusted larynx cancer incidence rates (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population). All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons.
Cancer Incidence - Larynx Cancer
(Cases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjusted, 2015-2019)
2.2
(1.8 - 2.7)
2.0Similar
Leukemia incidence refers to the number of persons newly diagnosed with leukemia within a specified time period and age group. Measures include 1) the number of newly diagnosed leukemia cases; and 2) age-adjusted leukemia incidence rates (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population). Measures are calculated for childern and all ages. Childhood rates (< 15 years of age and < 20 years of age) are expressed per 1,000,000 persons. Rates for all ages are expressed per 100,000 persons.
Cancer Incidence - Leukemia
(Cases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjusted, 2015-2019)
15.1
(13.8 - 16.4)
13.3Worse
Liver and intrahepatic bile duct cancer incidence refers to the number of persons newly diagnosed with liver and intrahepatic bile duct cancer during a specified time period. Measures include 1) the number of newly diagnosed cases of the liver and intrahepatic bile duct cancer; and 2) age-adjusted incidence rate of the liver and intrahepatic bile duct cancer (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population. All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons.
Cancer Incidence - Liver and Intrahepatic Bile Duct
(Cases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjusted, 2015-2019)
10.3
(9.3 - 11.3)
10.2Similar
Mesothelioma incidence refers to the number of persons newly diagnosed with mesothelioma during a specified time period. Measures include 1) the number of newly diagnosed mesothelioma cases; and 2) age-adjusted mesothelioma incidence rates (adjusted to the 2000 US standard population). All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons.
Cancer Incidence - Mesothelioma
(Cases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjusted, 2015-2019)
0.6
(0.4 - 0.9)
0.6Similar
Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) incidence refers to the number of persons newly diagnosed with NHL within a specified time period. Measures include 1) the number of newly diagnosed NHL cases; and 2) age-adjusted NHL incidence rates (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population). All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons.
Cancer Incidence - Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
(Cases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjusted, 2015-2019)
15.1
(13.8 - 16.3)
14.5Similar
Cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx incidence refers to the number of persons newly diagnosed with cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx during a specified time period. Measures include 1) the number of newly diagnosed cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx cases; and 2) age-adjusted cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx incidence rates.
Cancer Incidence - Oral Cavity and Pharynx
(Cases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjusted, 2015-2019)
12.4
(11.3 - 13.5)
12.6Similar
Pancreatic cancer incidence refers to the number of persons newly diagnosed with pancreatic cancer during a specified time period. Measures include 1) the number of newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer cases; and 2) age-adjusted pancreatic cancer incidence rates (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population). All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons.
Cancer Incidence - Pancreatic Cancer
(Cases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjusted, 2015-2019)
12.7
(11.6 - 13.8)
11.7Similar
Thyroid cancer incidence refers to the number of persons newly diagnosed with thyroid cancer during a specified time period. Measures include 1) the number of newly diagnosed thyroid cancer cases; and 2) age-adjusted thyroid cancer incidence rates (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population). All rates are expressed per 100,000 persons.
Cancer Incidence - Thyroid Cancer
(Cases per 100,000 Population, Age-adjusted, 2015-2019)
18.1
(16.7 - 19.5)
15.4Worse
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema, is a chronic lung disease that makes it hard to breathe. For this definition, a COPD death has an underlying OR CONTRIBUTING cause of death with ICD-10 codes J40-J44. Data for combined years 2010-2016.
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Deaths
(Deaths per 100,000 Population, Age-adjusted, 2016-2020)
60.9
(58.0 - 63.9)
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema, is a chronic lung disease that makes it hard to breathe. A COPD Emergency Department (ED) visit is a trip to the ED by a New Mexico resident that occurs with COPD listed as the primary (first-listed) diagnosis of a New Mexico resident. A COPD diagnosis includes the ICD-9-CM codes 490-492 or 496 or 493.2* when 490-492 or 496 is present on any secondary diagnoses, and, after 10/2015, the ICD-10-CM codes J40-J44. Measures include: 1) the number of COPD ED visits by age, sex, county, small areas (for years with geocoded data), month and or year, 2) Average COPD ED visits by month, 3) crude rate of COPD ED visits per 10,000 population by age, sex, county, small areas, month and or years, 4) age-adjusted rate of COPD ED visits per 10,000 population by age, sex, county, small areas , month and or years. Data for combined years 2010-2020.
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Emergency Department Visits
(Number of Emergency Department Visits, 2016-2020)
7,150
Emergency Department (ED) visits for carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning are the visits of New Mexico residents due to unintentional/accidental CO poisoning. These CO poisoning admissions could be fire-related, non-fire-related or of unknown cause/intent. Measures are: 1) Annual number of ED visits from CO poisoning; 2) Annual crude CO poisoning ED visit rate per 100,000 population; and 3) Annual age-adjusted CO poisoning ED Visit rate. Rates are per 100,000 population. Age-adjusted rates are calculated by the direct method to the Year 2000 US Standard population, http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr47/nvs47_03.pdf, Age Standardization of Death Rates: Implementation of the Year 2000 Standard by Robert N. Anderson, Ph.D., and Harry M. Rosenberg, Ph.D., National Vital Statistics Reports From the CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Volume 47, Number 3. Data for combined years 2008-2016.
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Emergency Department Visits
(Emergency Department Visits per 10,000 Population, Age-adjusted, Non-standard Period)
6.9
(6.0 - 7.9)
7.6Similar
Hospitalizations for carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning are the admissions of New Mexico residents due to unintentional/accidental CO poisoning. These CO poisoning admissions could be fire-related, non-fire-related or of unknown cause/origin. Measures are: 1) annual number of hospitalizations from carbon monoxide poisoning; 2) Annual crude carbon monoxide poisoning hospitalization rate; and 3) Annual age-adjusted carbon monoxide poisoning hospitalization rate. Rates are per 100,000 population. Age-adjusted rates are calculated by the direct method to the Year 2000 US Standard population, http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr47/nvs47_03.pdf, Age Standardization of Death Rates: Implementation of the Year 2000 Standard by Robert N. Anderson, Ph.D., and Harry M. Rosenberg, Ph.D., National Vital Statistics Reports From the CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Volume 47, Number 3.
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Hospitalizations
(Hospital Admissions per 100,000 Population, Age-adjusted, 2016-2020)
0.8
(0.5 - 1.1)
0.6Similar
An emergency department (ED) visit for health stress is defined as an illness of a New Mexico resident being treated in an acute care in-state hospital in an ED for treatment as an outpatient or placed in an acute care hospital (admitted) as an inpatient subsequent to treatment in the ED between May 1 to September 30, inclusive, during each year. Heat stress is defined as a constellation of explicit effects of hot weather on the body, including heat stroke, and sunstroke (hyperthermia), heat syncope or collapse, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, heat fatigue, heat edema, and other unspecified clinical effects attributed to excessive heat exposure. Cases of heat stress are classified as any primary or secondary diagnosis code included in the range of the International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition, Clinical Modification (ICD_9-CM) 992.0-992.9 or cause of injury code in the range E900.0 or E900.9 or ICD-10-CMs T67, X30, or X32 (excluding cases with a code W92). However, cases with a code of E900.1 (man-made source of heat) anywhere in the patient medical record are excluded. Measures include 1) the number of ED visits for heat stress; 2) crude rate of ED visits for heat stress per 100,000 population; and 3) age-adjusted rate of ED visits for heat stress per 100,000 population (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population).
Heat Stress Emergency Department Visits
(Emergency Department Visits per 100,000 Population, 2020)
10.9
(8.4 - 13.4)
A heat stress hospitalization is an admission of a New Mexico resident to an acute care in-state hospital that occurs in state as an inpatient between May 1 to September 30, inclusive, during each year. Heat stress is defined as a constellation of explicit effects of hot weather on the body, including heat stroke, and sunstroke (hyperthermia), heat syncope or collapse, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, heat fatigue, heat edema, and other unspecified clinical effects attributed to excessive heat exposure. Cases of heat stress are classified as any primary or other diagnosis included in the rage of the International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition, Clinical Modification (ICD_9-CM) 992.0-992.9 or cause of injury code in the range E900.0 or E900.9 or ICD-10-CMs T67, X30, or X32 (excluding cases with a code W92). However, cases with a code of E900.1 (man-made source of heat) anywhere in the patient medical record are excluded. Measures include 1) the number of ED visits for heat stress; 2) crude rate of ED visits for heat stress per 100,000 population; and 3) age-adjusted rate of ED visits for heat stress per 100,000 population (adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 US standard population).
Heat Stress Hospitalizations
(Hospitalizations per 100,000 Population, Age-adjusted, 2016-2020)
1.6
(1.2 - 2.0)
1.9Similar
  • Better is when the community is better and the difference is statistically significant.*
  • Similar is when the community is not statistically different.**
  • Worse is when the community is worse and the difference is statistically significant.*

* The difference is statistically significant when the NM comparison value is outside the community value's confidence interval range.
** The difference is NOT statistically significant when the NM comparison value falls between the community value's lower and upper confidence limits.