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Diagnosed Adult Asthma Prevalence: Current Prevalence by Year, Adults Aged 18+, New Mexico and U.S., 2005 to 2020

Indicator Report Data View Options

Question Wording: Have you ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health professional that you had asthma? Do you still have asthma?
  • Break*Break in the trend line for BRFSS weighting method difference.

Why Is This Important?

Asthma is one of the common chronic diseases in New Mexico, with an estimated 136,000 adults currently having the disease. People with asthma are more likely to miss school or work, report feelings of depression, and experience an overall reduced quality of life. Asthma is also costly, with expenses from routine checkups, emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and medications putting a significant burden on families, the health care sector, and the economy. Though it cannot be cured, asthma can be controlled through quality health care, appropriate medications, and good self-management skills. When asthma is controlled, people with the disease have few, if any, symptoms, and can live normal and productive lives. Asthma is frequently diagnosed in childhood. Sometimes asthma symptoms may go dormant for a number of years only to return later in adulthood. Given this complexity, two prevalence measures are helpful in assessing the disease burden: Lifetime prevalence (if an individual has ever been diagnosed as having asthma) and Current prevalence (if the individual reports he or she still has asthma).

Definition

The estimated proportion of New Mexico adults with diagnosed asthma. Weighted Survey Data. The percentages reported above have been produced by weighting the sample so that the results better represent the New Mexico population. The sample sizes reported in the table are unweighted. Percentages calculated using the unweighted sample sizes will not be accurate. The confidence bounds are asymmetric. They do not extend evenly above and below the percentage, especially as the percentage gets close to 0% or 100%.

Data Notes

Estimates for 2011 and forward should not be compared to earlier years (please refer to Data Interpretation Issues, below).

Data Sources

  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, together with New Mexico Department of Health, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau.
    (https://www.nmhealth.org/about/erd/ibeb/brfss/)
  • U.S. data source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Prevalence and Trends Data.
    (https://www.cdc.gov/brfss/brfssprevalence)

How the Measure is Calculated

  • Numerator:

    LIFETIME PREVALENCE: Estimated number of adult (i.e., 18 and older) New Mexicans who responded, "yes" (within the survey year) to the BRFSS question: "Have you ever been told by a doctor that you have asthma?" CURRENT PREVALENCE: Estimated number of adult (i.e., 18 and older) New Mexicans who responded, "yes" (within the survey year) to the BRFSS question: "Do you still have asthma?"
  • Denominator:

    Number of adult (i.e., 18 and older) New Mexicans in a specified population who responded to the BRFSS within the survey year.

Data Issues

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is an ongoing survey of adults about health-related behaviors, health conditions, and preventive services. Data are collected in all 50 states, D.C., and U.S. territories. The survey is conducted using scientific telephone survey methods for landline and cellular phones (with cellular since 2011). The landline phone portion of the survey excludes adults living in group quarters such as college dormitories, nursing homes, military barracks, and prisons. The cellular phone portion of the survey includes adult students living in college dormitories but excludes other group quarters. Beginning with 2011, the BRFSS updated its surveillance methods by adding in calls to cell phones and changing its weighting methods. These changes improve BRFSS' ability to take into account the increasing proportion of U.S. adults using only cellular telephones. Because of these changes, the data from years prior to 2011 are not directly comparable to data from 2011 and later. Please see the [[a href="/nmibis-view/docs/Query/BRFSS/BRFSS_fact_sheet_Aug2012.pdf BRFSS Method Change Factsheet]]. Responses have been weighted to reflect the New Mexico adult population by age, sex, ethnicity, geographic region, marital status, education level, home ownership and type of phone. The "missing" and "don't know" responses are not included when calculating a percentage.

Health Topic Pages Related to: Asthma Prevalence among Adults

Community Health Resources and Links





Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

Indicator Data Last Updated On 04/05/2022, Published on 05/25/2022
Environmental Health Epidemiology Bureau, Asthma Program, Epidemiology and Response Division, New Mexico Department of Health, 1190 S. Saint Francis Drive, Suite 1320, Santa Fe, NM 87505, Srikanth Paladugu, Bureau Chief, Srikanth.Paladugu@state.nm.us